Non-Fiction

Kaleidoscope Literary Analysis

 

Kaleidoscope Literary Analysis

                    In Ray Bradbury’s short story entitled “Kaleidoscope”, are a variety of different characters. In the opening line, Bradbury says that a spaceship has been ripped up “with a giant can opener”. Many men are thrown from this ship in various different directions at thousands of miles per hour: each with their own different fate. One of the first characters introduced is a man named Hollis. Hollis is first brought into play after a man named Stone calls out to him.

                    Stone is a man filled with fear at the start of the story, and Hollis is the only one who can bring a sense of peace to his mind. It is revealed to us, early on, that each man in this story is destined for something different. The Captain  is destined to hit the moon, Hollis for earth, but each of them falling in space. The men were scared, and for the most part, Hollis was the one to put them at ease.

                    “Oh, it’s a long way down… I don’t want to die, it’s a long way down,” said a voice through the walkies. This was a man named Stimson. Hollis attempts to talk sense into his frightened head; Stimson held to his fear and began to scream. Hollis was the one to make it stop: he killed Stimson. Now Lespere came into the picture.

                    Lespere was a man of strong words and a colourful world. He came from drinking, gambling, and had a wife on Mars and one of Venus. Hollis wished he could have had that. But now, falling in space, Hollis knew that none of those things Lespere had done in the past truly mattered. All the men from the ship would die in one way or another out in space. “From this outer edge of his life, looking back, there was only one remorse, and that was only that he wished to go on living. Did all dying people feel this way, as if they had never lived?” After silence and contemplation on Hollis’s part, he spoke: “It’s all over Lespere!”

                    Out from the depths of the cosmos, a voice rings out: Stone’s. He tells the men of the stars about a group of meteors. “I think I’m in the Myrmidone cluster that goes out past Mars and in toward Earth once every five years. I’m right in the middle. It’s like a big kaleidoscope. You get all kinds of colors and shapes and sizes. God, it’s beautiful, all that metal.” Stone’s character turns from being scared, to accepting his death and joins the stars. Hollis looks to the stars and saw nothing but a whirlpool of gems and colors. The friends said goodbye.

                    Each man left knew their time was limited; they said goodbye. Hollis – not wanting to die nor wanting to live – knew his fate was Earth. He knew that he would burn like a meteor when he hit the atmosphere, but did not know if he would be seen. As Hollis is falling to Earth, a boy looked up to him and thought of him as a shooting star. The boy’s mother looked up to this star and told him to make a wish. Even in death, Hollis was a ray of hope to others.

Memoir · Non-Fiction · Short Story

A Short Memoir

I remember this moment as if it had happened five minutes ago. I had walked into the large, wooden, double doors of House of Blues, and was met by a loud rock band on stage. The walkway was filled with teenagers and tipsy adults. It was dark, but the flashing lights lit my way. I kept checking down at my phone to see if she had texted me, but I realized I had lost service.

 

My two friends, sister, and dad had faded away when I heard my name. The voice I had only heard in videos on Instagram or over video chat. I looked around the crowded area and my vision grew blurry from tears. Everyone and everything faded away around me as my eyes landed on her. I felt my knees grow weak as I took the three steps to meet her. I fell into her open arms as she fell into mine. I had envisioned this moment for the past three years. I pictured every word I ever wanted to say to her. But in that moment, all words abandoned me; all I could say was four little words: “Sierra, I love you.” My chest hurt as I sobbed and gasped for air. All I could think was that…this is the person I told everything to for three years. The only person I felt I could trust. She told me every detail of her life, and I told her every detail of mine. This…person- This incredible human being needed to know how much I loved her — that she was my best friend. And I could tell she thought the same thing.

 

My friend pulled us from each other as the band on stage was finishing their set. We decided we should find a spot to stand in the crowd and Sierra showed us to a place up front her and her friend were. The two of us cried and cried and cried as we sang along to the bands on stage and danced together. And when it ended, we cried as we had to say goodbye.
That night, on the way home, my throat hurt from the singing and the screaming and the crying. My legs were sore from standing for two hours. My head spun from the noise and the flashing lights. I was exhausted from being awake since 6:30 am and it was almost 2 am. Even though I was in physical pain, I knew this was the happiest I had ever been, and maybe ever will be.

Non-Fiction

“Beat! Beat! Drums!” Literary Analysis

In Walt Whitman’s “Beat! Beat! Drums!”, he uses alliteration and strong use of metaphor and simile to express his frustration and passion for his call to arms and end slavery. Whitman uses hard consonants to imitate drums and unique language to leave a mark on his readers.

The first line of the poem, you read these hard consonants and begin to realize Whitman is imitating a drum. He goes on and tells these bugles to blow – he is making the reader picture war. “Into the school where the scholar studies…” He turns and uses hard ‘s’s to imitate a whip, as used as a common punishment for slaves in the North Atlantic slave trade. Whitman “beat, beat, drums! -blow you bugles, blow!” is the way he starts each stanza, further etching this dark gloom of war into the reader’s head. As the poem goes on, these drum beats seem to grow louder. “No bargainers bargains by day – no broker of speculators…” One may picture this dark image of war as the drum beats and the bugles blow.

Walt Whitman’s use of metaphor and simile puts the reader right into the time era. Whitman urges for no peace, no happiness, and no tears till this issue is at an end. He personifies slavery and says it’s “ a ruthless force”. Without saying, Whitman uses the bugles and drums as a call to action. Not only that, but he is referring to the instruments as his audience and having them be the bugles and drums. Whitman” readers are the ones who are being called to arms.

Walt Whitman uses adequate use of alliteration and simile and metaphor in his poem “Beat! Beat! Drums!” By doing so, he expresses deep frustration and intense passion to put an end to slavery. Whitman writes in a way to leave such a clear impact on the audience – as he did.